Latest News

Latest News

Chronicle on $645,000 Sabeghi settlement

Chronicle on $645,000 Sabeghi settlement

The City of Oakland has tentatively authorized paying Army veteran Kayvan Sabeghi $645,000 to resolve his lawsuit over his beating by OPD “Tango Team” Officer Frank Uu during an Occupy Oakland demonstration on November 2, 2011. Rachel Lederman, Dennis Cunningham and Bobbie Stein represented Sabeghi in the federal civil rights lawsuit. The Sabeghi settlement comes less than six months after the city approved over $2 million in settlements to resolve two other cases over OPD’s repression of Occupy and Justice for Oscar Grant demonstrations, which were also litigated by Rachel and other NLG lawyers and legal workers.

SF Weekly on Sabeghi settlement

Occupy Oakland: Police Brutality Tab Reaches Nearly $2.9M

Rachel interviewed on the ongoing struggle to reform OPD’s crowd control practices

Read this in depth article by Kate Conger in the SF Weekly on the long term struggle to stop OPD abuses against protesters.

Million Dollar Settlements Bolster Bay Area Protesters’ Rights

Million Dollar Settlements Bolster Bay Area Protesters’ Rights

Article by Brad Thomson on the recent victories in the Spalding and Campbell lawsuits.

NLG Obtains $1.17M, OPD Reforms for Occupy Oakland Protesters and Journalists

Read all about it here.

Rachel in the UK Guardian on Occupy settlement

Rachel in the UK Guardian on Occupy settlement

SF Weekly on second $1m+ settlement

SF Weekly on second $1m+ settlement

$1.17M Settlement for Occupy protesters and journalists

NLG press release on our

$1.17M Settlement for Occupy protesters and journalists

in Campbell, et al. v. City of Oakland.

Everything you could want to know about life after DOMA

For many fact sheets on from NCLR on various aspects of Life After DOMA click here

Same sex marriage decisions!

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The United States Supreme Court has struck down DOMA! DOMA is the federal Defense of Marriage Act, a 1996 law that prohibited the federal government from recognizing the marriages of same-sex couples for purposes of federal programs and benefits such as Social Security and immigration. In a separate decision today, the Court also dismissed the appeal by supporters of Prop 8. Prop 8 was the 2008 ballot initiative that stripped same-sex couples of the freedom to marry in California. In 2010, District Judge Vaughn Walker struck down that proposition as unconstitutional. The Supreme Court’s order today means that Judge Walker’s decision is the final word, and clears the way for same-sex couples to marry again in California. Unfortunately today’s Supreme Court decisions do not mean that other states that do not presently allow same-sex marriage, have to do so.

This handout from NCLR will answer a lot of your questions about what this means for same-sex couples in California.

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